9 Meal Ideas to Help You Lose Weight – Health News | Current Health News | Medical News – FOXNews.com

Leave a comment

By now, you probably know that there are no miracle weight-loss solutions. The only way to shed some pounds and keep them off is to change your eating habits by having healthy, balanced meals and cutting down on fat, sugar, simple carbs, and junk food.

We know; that’s easier said than done.

Here are nine meal ideas to help you lose weight. We’ve also been kind enough to provide you with examples for your three main meals of the day (breakfast, lunch and dinner).

Breakfast

You’ve probably heard this a thousand times: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. According to The National Weight Control Registry, breakfast is one of the key factors to long-term weight control. In fact, studies published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition show that people who skip breakfast tend to be heavier than those who eat a healthy morning meal.

Eating within the first hour after you wake up helps to maintain your blood sugar and hormone levels, which keeps your energy level high throughout the morning and ensures that you don’t overeat at lunchtime. It also kick-starts your metabolism, which will actually burn more calories throughout the day.

However, choose wisely since lots of typical breakfast foods are comprised of simple carbohydrates, such as white bread, many breakfast cereals (particularly brands for kids) and regular bagels. Because they are very easily digested, simple carbs send your blood sugar shooting up. When it comes back down, you’ll feel ravenous. When looking at breakfast meal ideas to help you lose weight, choose complex carbs and protein instead.

3 healthy breakfast ideas

1. 2 slices of whole-wheat toast with 1 tablespoon of peanut butter or apple butter (apple puree that tastes great but does not contain any actual butter and has very little fat) and 1 medium apple.

2. ½ cup of granola or high-fiber cereal (which will keep you feeling full) mixed into 1 cup fat-free fruit yogurt.

3. 1 small whole-wheat bagel with 1 tablespoon of light cream cheese and 1 tablespoon of light strawberry jam.

What to avoid:

— Buttered toast

— Muffins

— Danishes

— Donuts

Lunch

Lunch is almost as important as breakfast in terms of avoiding a mid-afternoon dip in energy, which can result in a high-sugar, high-fat snack binge. If possible, bring your own lunch to work rather than eat out; even seemingly “safe” salads can be diet nightmares if drenched in fatty dressing. The fact is you never know what you’re getting unless you make it yourself. If you must eat out, pick items that are grilled, steamed or poached and ask for dressings and sauces on the side.

A great side dish to any lunch might be ½ cup of baby carrots, 1 medium piece of fruit, 1 cup fat-free yogurt, or 1 low-fat granola bar.

3 healthy lunch ideas:

1. Turkey wrap: 1 flour tortilla, 1 teaspoon light mayonnaise, 2 to 3 thin slices of deli turkey, ½ cup of shredded lettuce, 2 slices of tomato, 1 tablespoon of shredded cheese, and salt & pepper to taste.

2. Grilled chicken salad: 2 cups of romaine lettuce, 3 ounces of grilled and seasoned chicken, 2 tablespoons of green or red peppers, 3 wedges of tomato, 6 slices of cucumber, 4 baby corns, and 2 tablespoons of low-fat dressing of your choice.

3. Maine crab rolls: 6 ounces of cooked jumbo lump crab meat, 1 teaspoon of light mayonnaise, 1 teaspoon of sweet pickle relish, ½ scallion (thinly sliced), 1 pinch ground pepper, and 2 hot dog buns.

What to avoid:

— Caesar salad (its dressing is packed with fat)

— Breaded or battered chicken

— French fries (as a side order)

Dinner

Avoid having a huge dinner since you likely won’t be doing any exercise afterward and are less likely to burn off the calories you ingest. But make sure to have a satisfying meal including protein, complex carbs and veggies in order to avoid snacking in front of the TV all night.

Once again, feel free to end your meal with a healthy dessert, such as 1 cup of fruit salad, 1 cup of fat-free yogurt, or ½ cup of frozen yogurt or sorbet.

3 healthy dinner ideas:

1. 4 ounces of baked or grilled seasoned chicken or 4 ounces of broiled filet of fish (sole, flounder, salmon, etc.), 1 small baked potato with 1 tablespoon of low-fat sour cream, ½ cup of steamed broccoli, and 1 teaspoon margarine.

2. Fajitas: 1 flour tortilla, 3 ounces of grilled chicken or steak, ½ cup grilled onions and green peppers, ¼ cup salsa and 1 tablespoon low-fat sour cream.

3. Pasta Primavera: ½ cup of cooked bow tie pasta, 1 cup of steamed broccoli, carrots, and zucchini, ¼ cup of marinara sauce, and 1 tablespoon of parmesan cheese.

What to avoid:

— Creamy high-fat sauces

— Huge portions

— High-calorie, high-fat desserts

Eat Well, Feel Well

Keep in mind that eating a variety of foods is key to losing weight and getting all your essential vitamins and nutrients. So don’t eat the same thing every day — you’ll get bored and go back to your unhealthy eating habits.

You can drop those pounds if you put your mind to it; it’s all about making small changes to your eating habits. If you cut out those fries at lunchtime, use hot mustard on your sandwiches instead of mayo, have fruit for dessert instead of chocolate cake, you’ll be shedding your extra weight in no time.

But don’t forget to indulge in a reasonable portion of your favorite dessert or snack food every so often — if you don’t, you’ll end up feeling deprived and fall back into your old habits.

Nice tips

Advertisements

A White House Review – A Report Card on Obama’s First Year – TIME

Leave a comment

A White House Review

Failed Democratic presidential candidate Michael Dukakis once suggested that elections should be about competence, not ideology. A year after winning the White House with a combination of ideological jousting and forceful technique, Barack Obama has been tested on both fronts.

His approval ratings have fallen, and ideologically, liberals seem almost as unhappy with Barack Obama as do conservatives. Those on the right think Obama has revealed himself to be a flaming liberal (the word socialist has been tossed around), while those on the left have expressed disappointment with Administration decisions ranging from the troop surge in Afghanistan to the potential abandonment of a public insurance option for those without health care coverage. Rating Obama’s first-year performance in terms of ideology, therefore, rests in a purely subjective realm. (See pictures of Obama’s first year in the White House.)

Rating the President on competence, however, is another matter. Obama proved his executive proficiency by running a successful underdog campaign against the more experienced Hillary Clinton and John McCain. Having inherited from the previous Administration a battered economy, two wars and a range of other thorny problems, it is fair to say that what success Obama has achieved so far in his new job owes to a level of skill his 2008 rivals predicted he would lack (rather than blind luck).

But while the nation’s 44th President has not been overmatched, he has not yet mastered the role either. Here, then, is a review of Obama’s first year on the job.

View the full list for “A Report Card on Obama’s First Year”

Good read but then I am biased LOL

Keepin’ it real fake, part CCXLVIII: Xderia X2 packs 2X the KIRF | Nokia N97 and Xperia X2 fakebrid

Leave a comment

Keepin’ it real fake, part CCXLVIII: Xderia X2 packs 2X the KIRF

Sony Ericsson’s Xperia X2 may have been delayed until next month, but official delays have never held back the inevitable KIRF hordes, as exemplified by this intriguing “Xderia X2.” Not content with simply approximating SE’s stylish QWERTY slider, this one goes the extra mile with a KIRF edition of Windows Mobile, not to mention some impressive specs like a 12.1 megapixel camera, dual SIM card slots, and a built-in FM radio — which may or may not match the phone’s actual specs. No word on a price just yet, but we’re guessing you’ll be able to buy anywhere from four to fourteen of these for the price of an actual X2.

Now if only these knockoffs would match their ‘innovation’ with actual specs rather than just looks.

Seth’s Blog: It’s no wonder they don’t trust us | I agree !!

Leave a comment

It’s no wonder they don’t trust us

I just set up a friend’s PC. I haven’t done that in a while.

Wow.

Apparently, a computer is now not a computer, it’s an opportunity to upsell you.

First, the setup insisted (for my own safety) that I sign up for an eternal subscription to Norton. Then it defaulted (opt out) to sending me promotional emails. Then there were the dozens (at least it felt like dozens) of buttons and searches I had to endure to switch the search box from Bing to Google. And the icons on the desktop that had been paid for by various partners and the this-comes-with-that of just about everything.

The digital world, even the high end brands, has become a sleazy carnival, complete with hawkers, barkers and a bearded lady. By the time someone actually gets to your site, they’ve been conned, popped up, popped under and upsold so many times they really have no choice but to be skeptical.

Basically, it’s a race to the bottom, with so many people spamming trackbacks, planning popups and scheming to trick the surfer with this or that that we’ve bullied people into a corner of believing no one.

You can play along, or you can be so clean and so straightforward that people are stunned into loyalty. You know, as in, “do it for the user,” and “offer stuff that just works” and “this is what you get and that’s all you get and you won’t have to wonder about the fine print.”

Rare and refreshing. An opportunity, in fact.

I really don’t like the way things are going these days.

Just realized that congee is actually the proper name for what I usually call poridge #trivia

1 Comment

Congee

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
Congee
Chinese rice congee.jpg
Chinese rice congee
Chinese name
Chinese 粥 or 稀饭
Min Chinese name
Chinese
Filipino name
Tagalog lúgao
Japanese name
Kanji 1. 粥
2.
Hiragana 1. かゆ
2. しらがゆ
Korean name
Hangul
Hanja
Malay name
Malay bubur
Portuguese name
Portuguese canja
Thai name
Thai โจ๊ก chok
Vietnamese name
Vietnamese cháo
Spanish name
Spanish arroz caldo
Khmer name
Khmer បបរ bâbâr (IPA: [bɑˈbɑː])
Indonesian name
Indonesian bubur
Javanese name
Javanese bubur
Burmese name
Burmese ဆန်ပြုတ် san byoke
Bengali name
Bengali জাউ jau (IPA: [dʒaw])
Hindi name
Hindi गांजी ganji
Malayalam name
Malayalam കഞ്ഞി kanji
Tamil name
Tamil kanji=கஞ்சி
Telugu name
Telugu ghanji
Tulu name
Tulu kanji

Rice congee (pronounced /ˈkɒndʒiː/) is a type of rice porridge that is eaten in many Asian countries. The word congee is possibly derived from the Dravidian language Tamil word கஞ்சி kanji.[1][2]

In some cultures, congee is eaten primarily as a breakfast food or late supper; while in others, it is eaten as a substitute for rice at other meals.

Congee can be made in a pot or in a rice cooker. Some rice cookers even have a “congee” setting, allowing the user to cook their breakfast congee overnight.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Cultural variations

[edit] China

There are many regional variations of Chinese congees (called zhou in Mandarin Chinese). For example, to make Cantonese congee, white rice is boiled in many times its weight of water for a long time until the rice breaks down and becomes a fairly viscous white porridge.[3] Congees made in other regions may use different types of rice with different quantities of water, thus resulting in a thicker or more viscous product.

It is often eaten with zha cai, salted duck eggs, lettuce and dace paste, bamboo shoots, youtiao, rousong, pickled tofu, wheat gluten, with other condiments, meat or century eggs.

Other seasonings, such as white pepper and soy sauce, may be added. Alternatively, grilled fish may be mixed in to provide a different texture.

Congee is often eaten with fried bread sticks known as youtiao. Congee with youtiao is commonly eaten as breakfast in many areas in China. Congee can be left watery or can be drained so that it has a texture similar to Western oatmeal porridge. Congee can also be made from brown rice, although this is less common and takes longer to cook.

Besides functioning as an everyday meal, congee is considered to be food therapy for the unwell. Ingredients can be determined by their supposed therapeutic value as well as flavor.

The origin of congee is unknown, but from many historical accounts, it was usually served during times of famine or when numerous patrons visited the temples. Thus, it can be interpreted as a way to stretch the rice supply to feed more people.

In China, congee has also been used to feed young infants. However, the cooking time is much longer than for okayu, and because it is for infants, the congee is not seasoned with salt or any other flavoring. Often it is mixed with pre-steamed and deboned fish.

Congee can also be made from other grains, like cornmeal, millet, barley, and sorghum. These are common in the north of China, where rice does not grow as well as other grains suited for a colder climate. Multigrain congee mixes are popularly sold in the health food sections of Chinese supermarkets. Congee with mung beans is usually eaten with sugar, just like red bean congee. The mung beans are eaten for their therapeutic “cooling” effect.[citation needed]

[edit] India

Udupi rice ganji is a variant made by Kannada-speaking, Tulu-speaking or Konkani people in and around Udupi and Mangalore (Karnataka, South India). Here parboiled rice (Kocheel akki in Kannada, oorpel aari in Tulu or ukadey tandool in Konkani) is steamed with a small amount of water. Fresh coconut is grated and its milk is skimmed; this milk is then added to the ganji. The ganji (called pej in Konkani) is served hot with fish curry, coconut chutney, or Indian pickles.

In Tamil Nadu and Kerala a plain rice porridge, or the thick supernatant water on overcooked rice is called ‘kanji’ with no stress on either syllable (or both short syllables in the Tamil system based on duration of sounds). In Andhra Pradesh state, it is called ganji in Telugu and mostly eaten as breakfast by the farmers and other village work-force.

[edit] Indonesia

In Indonesian, congee is called “bubur”. It is a favourite breakfast food, and many food vendors pass through the streets at dawn to serve it at residences, while calling “bubur”. A popular version is “bubur ayam”, which is congee with shredded chicken meat. It is also served with many condiments, such as green onion, crispy fried shallot, fried soybean, Chinese crullers (You tiao, known as cakwe in Indonesia),both salty and sweet soy sauce, and sometimes it is topped with yellow chicken broth & kerupuk/indonesian style crackers. In contrast to many other Indonesian dishes, it is not spicy. Sambal or chili paste is served separately.

The food hawkers sometimes have sate for accompanied, made from quail egg or chicken intestine, liver, gizzard, or heart.

In another region of Indonesia, Manado. It is very popular with bubur Manado or Tinotuan Manadonese porridge, a healthier choice porridge with ample vegetables. It is a bit different from the one which is sold in Java island. It is made from rice porridge and enhanced with water spinach or kangkung, corn kernels, yam or sweet potato, dried salty fish, lemon basil or kemangi leaves, and melinjo or gnetum gnemon leaves.

[edit] Japan

Okayu (also kayu) is the name for the type of congee eaten in Japan.[4] Okayu is still considerably thicker than congee produced in other cultures.[citation needed] For example, a typical Cantonese style congee uses a water to rice ratio of 12:1, but okayu typically uses water to rice ratios of 5:1 (zen-gayu) or 7:1 (shichibu-gayu). Also, its cooking time is short compared to other types of congee; okayu is cooked for about 30 minutes, while Cantonese congees cook for an hour or more.

Okayu (お粥?) may simply consist of rice and water, although salt is often added for seasoning. Beaten eggs could be beaten into it to thicken it into gruel. Toppings may be added to enhance flavour; negi (a type of green onion), salmon, roe, ginger, and umeboshi (pickled ume fruit) are among the most common. Similarly, miso or chicken stock may be used to flavor the broth. Most Japanese electric rice cookers have a setting for okayu.

In Japan, okayu is popularly known as a food served to the ill, occupying a similar cultural status to that of chicken noodle soup in America. Because it is soft and easily digestible, okayu is the first solid food served to Japanese infants; it is used to transition them from liquids to the thicker rice dishes which constitute much of the Japanese diet. It is also commonly eaten by the elderly for the same reasons.

A type of okayu called nanakusa-gayu (七草粥, “Seven Herb Porridge”) is traditionally eaten on 7 January, as a way of using special herbs that protect against evils, and to invite good luck and longevity in the new year. Moreover, as a simple, light dish, nanakusagayu serves as a break from the many heavy dishes eaten over the Japanese New Year.

[edit] Korea

In Korea the dish goes by the name juk [jook] ([tɕuk]} derived from the Chinese language in which juk [jook] means the same thing and is often cooked with vegetables, abalone, tuna, or other ingredients to create variants of the dish. Being largely unflavored, it is served together with a number of side dishes such as kimchi, pickled cuttlefish, spicy octopus, chicken, or other side-dishes, to add flavor to the dish. One variety is called jatjuk made with finely ground pine nut flour.

Juk is a common take-out dish, with several large chain stores selling it in South Korea, such as Bon Juk (본죽) and Hyun Juk (현죽).

It is the ideal choice of food for the ill or elderly as it is easily consumed and digested.

[edit] Philippines

Filipino Arroz Caldo – Lugao

arroz caldo

Lúgao (alternately spelled “lugaw” or “lugau”) is the Filipino name for congee. Very similar to Cantonese style congee, lúgao is typically of a thicker consistency, retaining the shape of the rice while achieving the same type of texture. It is boiled with strips of fresh ginger. Other flavors may be added according to taste. Most often it will be topped with scallions and served with crispy fried garlic. As with okayu, fish or chicken stock may also be used to flavor the broth. Lúgao can also be served with tokwa’t baboy (diced tofu and pork), goto (beef tripe), utak (pig’s brain), dila (pork tongue), litid (beef ligaments) as well as calamansi, fish sauce, and soy sauce. It is often served to the ill and the elderly, and is favored among Pinoys living abroad in colder climates because it is warm, soft, and easily digestible.

Some provinces prefer the Spanish-influenced arroz caldo (literally broth rice), which is often mistaken for a European dish due to its name. Arroz caldo is actually a Chinese congee that was adapted to the tastes of the Spanish colonial settlers who patronized Chinese restaurants in the Philippines. As the Spanish could not pronounce Chinese, they gave it a Spanish name for easy reference.

Arroz caldo is most usually spiced with saffron and black pepper in place of or in addition to the more traditional ginger and scallion. Arroz caldo more closely resembles risotto than congee, and is clearly recognized by the bright yellow hue contributed by the addition of saffron, and the larger pieces of meat. Arroz caldo is more popular among those of Ilokano heritage, although people of other provinces, such as Cebu, often add Philippine prawns, olive oil, bay leaf, and Chinese sausage.

[edit] Portugal

In Portugal there is a traditional soup made of rice and chicken meat that is named Canja (very similar pronunciation to congee). The rice is not cooked for as long as in Asian congee, so it is very soft but still consistent. Traditionally the chicken should have small eggs, which are then carefully boiled and served in the canja; this soup is sometimes served with a fresh mint leaf on top. Canja is traditionally given to people recovering from disease, just like in Asia, and is strongly valued as comfort food. In some regions of Portugal, there is even an ancient custom of feeding the mother a strict diet of canja in the first weeks after childbirth. Due to Portuguese influence, canja is also eaten traditionally in Brasil and Cape Verde.

[edit] Taiwan

As a heritage of Chinese Culture, in Taiwan, congee is prepared almost identically to congee in Fujian Province – China, and consists of rice and water, with few other ingredients. Sweet potato is often added for taste, and eggs are sometimes beaten into it to thicken it to a gruel. As in China, congee is often served to the ill and those with difficulty chewing. A variety of side dishes are often served with congee as well.

[edit] Thailand

In Thailand, rice congee is known as “jok” (โจ๊ก) and is often served as breakfast with a raw or partially-cooked egg added. In most, minced pork or beef is also added and the dish is usually topped with a small version of youtiao (known as pathongko by Thais), garlic, slivered ginger, spicy pickles such as pickled radish and chopped spring onions. Although it is more popular as a breakfast dish, many stores specializing in congee will sell it throughout the entire day. Variations in the meat and toppings are also frequently found.

[edit] Vietnam

In Vietnam, rice congee is called cháo. It is sometimes cooked together with pandan leaves. Cháo gà is a variety of cháo cooked with chicken and garlic. Other combinations includes: “Cháo vịt” cooked with duck meat and “Cháo lòng heo” made with “lòng heo” a type of sausage made of various pig organs. Many people tend to eat cháo when they feel sick because it is easy to digest. It is also made for death anniversary ceremonies, during which it is offered to the spirits of one’s ancestors.

[edit] Cambodia

In Cambodia, rice congee (babaw) is widely eaten for breakfast. Plain congee is typically eaten with salted eggs, pickled vegetables, or dried fish. Chicken congee, pig’s blood congee, and seafood congee are also commonly eaten.

[edit] Burma

In Burma, rice congee is called san byohk, literally “rice boiled”. It is very thin and plain, often made with just rice and water but sometimes with chicken or pork stock and served with a simple garnish of chopped spring onions and crispy fried onions. As in other Asian countries, san byohk is considered lu ma mar zar – “food for the sickly” and thus given to people who are unwell.

[edit] See also

[edit] References

  1. ^ ‘Dravidian Studies 1, by T. Burrow Bulletin of the School of Oriental Studies, University of London © 1938
  2. ^ “congee.”“. Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary.. MICRA, Inc.. 23 Nov. 2008.. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/congee. 
  3. ^ Basic Congee Recipe, About.com, Accessed May 2, 2007
  4. ^ Okayu recipe, About.com, Accessed May 2, 2007

I feel so retarded right about now as I eat this very often LOL

Just realized that congee is actually the proper name for what I usually call poridge #trivia

Leave a comment

Congee

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
Congee
Chinese rice congee.jpg
Chinese rice congee
Chinese name
Chinese 粥 or 稀饭
Min Chinese name
Chinese
Filipino name
Tagalog lúgao
Japanese name
Kanji 1. 粥
2.
Hiragana 1. かゆ
2. しらがゆ
Korean name
Hangul
Hanja
Malay name
Malay bubur
Portuguese name
Portuguese canja
Thai name
Thai โจ๊ก chok
Vietnamese name
Vietnamese cháo
Spanish name
Spanish arroz caldo
Khmer name
Khmer បបរ bâbâr (IPA: [bɑˈbɑː])
Indonesian name
Indonesian bubur
Javanese name
Javanese bubur
Burmese name
Burmese ဆန်ပြုတ် san byoke
Bengali name
Bengali জাউ jau (IPA: [dʒaw])
Hindi name
Hindi गांजी ganji
Malayalam name
Malayalam കഞ്ഞി kanji
Tamil name
Tamil kanji=கஞ்சி
Telugu name
Telugu ghanji
Tulu name
Tulu kanji

Rice congee (pronounced /ˈkɒndʒiː/) is a type of rice porridge that is eaten in many Asian countries. The word congee is possibly derived from the Dravidian language Tamil word கஞ்சி kanji.[1][2]

In some cultures, congee is eaten primarily as a breakfast food or late supper; while in others, it is eaten as a substitute for rice at other meals.

Congee can be made in a pot or in a rice cooker. Some rice cookers even have a “congee” setting, allowing the user to cook their breakfast congee overnight.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Cultural variations

[edit] China

There are many regional variations of Chinese congees (called zhou in Mandarin Chinese). For example, to make Cantonese congee, white rice is boiled in many times its weight of water for a long time until the rice breaks down and becomes a fairly viscous white porridge.[3] Congees made in other regions may use different types of rice with different quantities of water, thus resulting in a thicker or more viscous product.

It is often eaten with zha cai, salted duck eggs, lettuce and dace paste, bamboo shoots, youtiao, rousong, pickled tofu, wheat gluten, with other condiments, meat or century eggs.

Other seasonings, such as white pepper and soy sauce, may be added. Alternatively, grilled fish may be mixed in to provide a different texture.

Congee is often eaten with fried bread sticks known as youtiao. Congee with youtiao is commonly eaten as breakfast in many areas in China. Congee can be left watery or can be drained so that it has a texture similar to Western oatmeal porridge. Congee can also be made from brown rice, although this is less common and takes longer to cook.

Besides functioning as an everyday meal, congee is considered to be food therapy for the unwell. Ingredients can be determined by their supposed therapeutic value as well as flavor.

The origin of congee is unknown, but from many historical accounts, it was usually served during times of famine or when numerous patrons visited the temples. Thus, it can be interpreted as a way to stretch the rice supply to feed more people.

In China, congee has also been used to feed young infants. However, the cooking time is much longer than for okayu, and because it is for infants, the congee is not seasoned with salt or any other flavoring. Often it is mixed with pre-steamed and deboned fish.

Congee can also be made from other grains, like cornmeal, millet, barley, and sorghum. These are common in the north of China, where rice does not grow as well as other grains suited for a colder climate. Multigrain congee mixes are popularly sold in the health food sections of Chinese supermarkets. Congee with mung beans is usually eaten with sugar, just like red bean congee. The mung beans are eaten for their therapeutic “cooling” effect.[citation needed]

[edit] India

Udupi rice ganji is a variant made by Kannada-speaking, Tulu-speaking or Konkani people in and around Udupi and Mangalore (Karnataka, South India). Here parboiled rice (Kocheel akki in Kannada, oorpel aari in Tulu or ukadey tandool in Konkani) is steamed with a small amount of water. Fresh coconut is grated and its milk is skimmed; this milk is then added to the ganji. The ganji (called pej in Konkani) is served hot with fish curry, coconut chutney, or Indian pickles.

In Tamil Nadu and Kerala a plain rice porridge, or the thick supernatant water on overcooked rice is called ‘kanji’ with no stress on either syllable (or both short syllables in the Tamil system based on duration of sounds). In Andhra Pradesh state, it is called ganji in Telugu and mostly eaten as breakfast by the farmers and other village work-force.

[edit] Indonesia

In Indonesian, congee is called “bubur”. It is a favourite breakfast food, and many food vendors pass through the streets at dawn to serve it at residences, while calling “bubur”. A popular version is “bubur ayam”, which is congee with shredded chicken meat. It is also served with many condiments, such as green onion, crispy fried shallot, fried soybean, Chinese crullers (You tiao, known as cakwe in Indonesia),both salty and sweet soy sauce, and sometimes it is topped with yellow chicken broth & kerupuk/indonesian style crackers. In contrast to many other Indonesian dishes, it is not spicy. Sambal or chili paste is served separately.

The food hawkers sometimes have sate for accompanied, made from quail egg or chicken intestine, liver, gizzard, or heart.

In another region of Indonesia, Manado. It is very popular with bubur Manado or Tinotuan Manadonese porridge, a healthier choice porridge with ample vegetables. It is a bit different from the one which is sold in Java island. It is made from rice porridge and enhanced with water spinach or kangkung, corn kernels, yam or sweet potato, dried salty fish, lemon basil or kemangi leaves, and melinjo or gnetum gnemon leaves.

[edit] Japan

Okayu (also kayu) is the name for the type of congee eaten in Japan.[4] Okayu is still considerably thicker than congee produced in other cultures.[citation needed] For example, a typical Cantonese style congee uses a water to rice ratio of 12:1, but okayu typically uses water to rice ratios of 5:1 (zen-gayu) or 7:1 (shichibu-gayu). Also, its cooking time is short compared to other types of congee; okayu is cooked for about 30 minutes, while Cantonese congees cook for an hour or more.

Okayu (お粥?) may simply consist of rice and water, although salt is often added for seasoning. Beaten eggs could be beaten into it to thicken it into gruel. Toppings may be added to enhance flavour; negi (a type of green onion), salmon, roe, ginger, and umeboshi (pickled ume fruit) are among the most common. Similarly, miso or chicken stock may be used to flavor the broth. Most Japanese electric rice cookers have a setting for okayu.

In Japan, okayu is popularly known as a food served to the ill, occupying a similar cultural status to that of chicken noodle soup in America. Because it is soft and easily digestible, okayu is the first solid food served to Japanese infants; it is used to transition them from liquids to the thicker rice dishes which constitute much of the Japanese diet. It is also commonly eaten by the elderly for the same reasons.

A type of okayu called nanakusa-gayu (七草粥, “Seven Herb Porridge”) is traditionally eaten on 7 January, as a way of using special herbs that protect against evils, and to invite good luck and longevity in the new year. Moreover, as a simple, light dish, nanakusagayu serves as a break from the many heavy dishes eaten over the Japanese New Year.

[edit] Korea

In Korea the dish goes by the name juk [jook] ([tɕuk]} derived from the Chinese language in which juk [jook] means the same thing and is often cooked with vegetables, abalone, tuna, or other ingredients to create variants of the dish. Being largely unflavored, it is served together with a number of side dishes such as kimchi, pickled cuttlefish, spicy octopus, chicken, or other side-dishes, to add flavor to the dish. One variety is called jatjuk made with finely ground pine nut flour.

Juk is a common take-out dish, with several large chain stores selling it in South Korea, such as Bon Juk (본죽) and Hyun Juk (현죽).

It is the ideal choice of food for the ill or elderly as it is easily consumed and digested.

[edit] Philippines

Filipino Arroz Caldo – Lugao

arroz caldo

Lúgao (alternately spelled “lugaw” or “lugau”) is the Filipino name for congee. Very similar to Cantonese style congee, lúgao is typically of a thicker consistency, retaining the shape of the rice while achieving the same type of texture. It is boiled with strips of fresh ginger. Other flavors may be added according to taste. Most often it will be topped with scallions and served with crispy fried garlic. As with okayu, fish or chicken stock may also be used to flavor the broth. Lúgao can also be served with tokwa’t baboy (diced tofu and pork), goto (beef tripe), utak (pig’s brain), dila (pork tongue), litid (beef ligaments) as well as calamansi, fish sauce, and soy sauce. It is often served to the ill and the elderly, and is favored among Pinoys living abroad in colder climates because it is warm, soft, and easily digestible.

Some provinces prefer the Spanish-influenced arroz caldo (literally broth rice), which is often mistaken for a European dish due to its name. Arroz caldo is actually a Chinese congee that was adapted to the tastes of the Spanish colonial settlers who patronized Chinese restaurants in the Philippines. As the Spanish could not pronounce Chinese, they gave it a Spanish name for easy reference.

Arroz caldo is most usually spiced with saffron and black pepper in place of or in addition to the more traditional ginger and scallion. Arroz caldo more closely resembles risotto than congee, and is clearly recognized by the bright yellow hue contributed by the addition of saffron, and the larger pieces of meat. Arroz caldo is more popular among those of Ilokano heritage, although people of other provinces, such as Cebu, often add Philippine prawns, olive oil, bay leaf, and Chinese sausage.

[edit] Portugal

In Portugal there is a traditional soup made of rice and chicken meat that is named Canja (very similar pronunciation to congee). The rice is not cooked for as long as in Asian congee, so it is very soft but still consistent. Traditionally the chicken should have small eggs, which are then carefully boiled and served in the canja; this soup is sometimes served with a fresh mint leaf on top. Canja is traditionally given to people recovering from disease, just like in Asia, and is strongly valued as comfort food. In some regions of Portugal, there is even an ancient custom of feeding the mother a strict diet of canja in the first weeks after childbirth. Due to Portuguese influence, canja is also eaten traditionally in Brasil and Cape Verde.

[edit] Taiwan

As a heritage of Chinese Culture, in Taiwan, congee is prepared almost identically to congee in Fujian Province – China, and consists of rice and water, with few other ingredients. Sweet potato is often added for taste, and eggs are sometimes beaten into it to thicken it to a gruel. As in China, congee is often served to the ill and those with difficulty chewing. A variety of side dishes are often served with congee as well.

[edit] Thailand

In Thailand, rice congee is known as “jok” (โจ๊ก) and is often served as breakfast with a raw or partially-cooked egg added. In most, minced pork or beef is also added and the dish is usually topped with a small version of youtiao (known as pathongko by Thais), garlic, slivered ginger, spicy pickles such as pickled radish and chopped spring onions. Although it is more popular as a breakfast dish, many stores specializing in congee will sell it throughout the entire day. Variations in the meat and toppings are also frequently found.

[edit] Vietnam

In Vietnam, rice congee is called cháo. It is sometimes cooked together with pandan leaves. Cháo gà is a variety of cháo cooked with chicken and garlic. Other combinations includes: “Cháo vịt” cooked with duck meat and “Cháo lòng heo” made with “lòng heo” a type of sausage made of various pig organs. Many people tend to eat cháo when they feel sick because it is easy to digest. It is also made for death anniversary ceremonies, during which it is offered to the spirits of one’s ancestors.

[edit] Cambodia

In Cambodia, rice congee (babaw) is widely eaten for breakfast. Plain congee is typically eaten with salted eggs, pickled vegetables, or dried fish. Chicken congee, pig’s blood congee, and seafood congee are also commonly eaten.

[edit] Burma

In Burma, rice congee is called san byohk, literally “rice boiled”. It is very thin and plain, often made with just rice and water but sometimes with chicken or pork stock and served with a simple garnish of chopped spring onions and crispy fried onions. As in other Asian countries, san byohk is considered lu ma mar zar – “food for the sickly” and thus given to people who are unwell.

[edit] See also

[edit] References

  1. ^ ‘Dravidian Studies 1, by T. Burrow Bulletin of the School of Oriental Studies, University of London © 1938
  2. ^ “congee.”“. Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary.. MICRA, Inc.. 23 Nov. 2008.. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/congee. 
  3. ^ Basic Congee Recipe, About.com, Accessed May 2, 2007
  4. ^ Okayu recipe, About.com, Accessed May 2, 2007

I feel so retarded right about now as I eat this very often LOL

Google Nexus One Specifications | Looks like the ultimate full touch screen phone. Will it deliver?

Leave a comment

Exclusive: Nexus One full specs detailed, invite-only retail sales starting January 5th?

We know you’re itching to get your hands on a Nexus One — Google’s managed to build buzz here the way only a couple companies in the world know how. Unfortunately, it sounds like you’re going to need to cross your fingers (or pull out that eBay emergency stash) to get one out of the gate, because we’ve got some intel here suggesting that it’ll be available only by “invitation” at first. Our tipster doesn’t have information on how those invites are going to be determined, other than the fact that it’s Google doing the inviting — if we had to guess, current registered developers are a strong possibility — but the good news, we suppose, is that T-Mobile will apparently sell the phone directly at some to-be-determined point in the future. Oh, but that’s not all — we’ve got specs, too. Lots of them. Here are the highlights, but follow the break for the whole shebang:

  • Android 2.1
  • 11.5mm thick
  • 512MB RAM, 512MB ROM, 4GB microSD in-box expandable to 32GB
  • 5 megapixel camera with mechanical AF and LED flash
  • HSPA 900 / 1700 / 2100, 7.2Mbps down and 2Mbps up — in other words, yes to T-Mobile 3G and no to AT&T 3G, though you’ll still be fine on EDGE
  • 3.7-inch WVGA AMOLED display

More temptations !! GAH !!

Older Entries